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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
reminder how other parts of the world is not evolved. in uganda, hate legislation is being pushed by the country's parliament a bill that criminalizes being lgbt punish able by death. that means approximatelydeath. 500,000 people could be imprisoned or sentenced to death. activists are all over the globe coming out against this so-called kill the gay's bill. frank is not only an acty sfris uganda but a man who's life is threatened by this legislation. joining him is fellow civil rights carrie kennedy. the center awarded frank for his efforts in uganda. good to have you here. you've been fighting this bill for years. david cato who is a friend of yours, recently killed in uganda for his work against fighting this bill. you've taken over his work. but are you basically handing yourself a death sentence by being on a program like this putting yourself in a line of fire? >> yes. i've been fighting this legislation for a long time now and if this legislation is passed into law, i will definitely be put life in prison or life -- or sentenced to death. and right knew, i'm here in new yor
permanent. they range from those for the focus on rwanda or uganda, today was formed in response to perpetrators for a genocide in rwanda to the dear the ortho singly focused on the drc itself. whatever the region for their founding, their terrorist eastern congo and the drc as a whole. we consider the flow of arms that enables their ongoing reign of terror. according to the u.n. office for coordination of humanitarian affairs, secured in eastern congo has placed approximately 2.4 million people nationwide, especially in the east. despite long-standing conflict in eastern congo, the oc hj estimates the majority displaced persons typically return within six to 18 months of their initial displacement and require minimal return assistance. while that may be true, it does not account for the kind of life congolese will have once they return to their homes. women continue to be targeted for gross abuse of the drc. a study that appeared in the american journal of public health included 48 women and girls are raped every hour. this year more than 100 females in the drc will have been ra
from those with a focus on rwanda or you uganda to those formed in response of the flight of the 1994 genocide in rwanda to the drc or those singularly focused on the drc itself. whatever the reason for their founding, these militias have terrorized the people of the eastern congo and the drc as a whole. we must identify their support base and then the flow of arms and other aid that enables their ongoing reign of terror. according to the u.n. office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs, insecurity in eastern congo has displaced approximately 2.4 million people nationwide, especially in the east. despite longstanding conflict in the eastern congo, the ocha estimates that the majority of displaced persons typically return to their areas of origin within 6-18 months of their initial displacement and require minimal return assistance. while that may be true, it does not account for the kind of life the congolese will have once they return to their homes. women continue to be targeted for gross abuse in the drc. a study that recently appeared in the american journal of public heal
to the united states. we have keep partners in the area we have worked with uganda and rue wan dpa da as we have dealt with situations and the instability coming out of the drc is a threat to all of that. we have seen in recent months that africa is increasingly important in our national security interest. the instability there is given rise to many al qaeda-inspired insurgety and that threatens our security. one of the biggest purpose of the hearing is get a bigger feel what they can do in the region to help. the biggest problem, the eesh drc is a lack of governance, a lack of rule of law, and a rogue gallery of a war loads, revolutionary, and violent groups and individual have taken advantage of the ungoverned space and created sprobs. building toward greater stability in the region has to be focus. the dod has done work in the reaming, we are currently working with the u began d.a. army and working with the army. one of the revolutionary groups that helped to destablize the drc. we tried to work with the drc military training one buy talon a few years bag to a strong success. it's consideredb
to governments wherever they are supporting conflict in congo. if rwanda and uganda are found to be continuing support from m23 and support and 23 efforts to obstruct peace process at the peace table, corresponding measures should be taken by the u.s. other governors to which the u.s. contributes huge amounts of american tax payers dollars. let's be clear. we don't want health and education and micro enterprise, the small-scale assistance that goes to the people to be stopped. that should continue, but it's the budget support and military assistance. those two categories are critical and the world bank is $135 million on the table right now in batches of the rwandan government. that should not be disbursed until the clear, forward movement on the peace process. fifth and finally, this one hasn't been discussed yet, but we would call for ahead of a summit on responsible investing in the great lakes. the united states in partnership with the european union, african union could facilitate investment on piece nine rather than minerals that exist today. in order to expand the pie in the region for
.f.k. center does, in its work for instance in uganda, which is going to be pa rt of african policy right now in uganda, we're helping to support bills in the uganda legislation to make homosexuality punishable by death. and they're getting ready in a few days -- >> that's right. >> explain that, kerry. because because i think,ed r had it not been for the r.f.k. center, many of us who call ourselves active wouldn't know about this. >> that's right. and it's winded its way through the political process and the speaker of the house has promised that she would pass it as a christmas present to the ewe beg ewe ugandan people. >> it's irony. for these people to be pushing this bill through that says homosexuality is punishable by death. and they have already begun to destroy lives. >> i want to ask you. i know this is an important year for the r.f.k. center. you're holding an auction with many interesting items, including dinner with harry belaf ourks nte. >> how about that. >> tell us about the auction and tell us what you're doing with this. >> so there are -- there's something for everyone in t
congo. now for example, if rwanda and uganda are found to be continued their support for m23 and are supporting m23 efforts to obstruct peace process, progress at the peace table, and corresponding measures should be taken by the u.s., other partner governments and multilateral organizations to which the u.s. contributes huge amounts of american taxpayers dollars. let's be clear about this. we don't want health and education and microenterprise comes small-scale assistance that goes to the people of rwanda to be stopped. that aid should be continued i believe, but the budget support and military assistance, those two categories of aid that are critical, and if the world bank, the world bank is $135 million on the table right now in budget support for the rwandan government. that should not be disbursed until we get clear forward movement on the peace process in congo. fifth and finally, and this one hasn't been discussed yet, but we would call for a high level summit on responsible investing in the great lakes. the united states in partnership with the union -- african union,
and the environment -- m 23 began on december 29 in uganda and are being mediated with uganda as the chair on the international conference of the great lakes region known as the i c g lra. as the two sides begin substantive con -- talks, the current cease-fire is holding and the parties continue to express commitment to a dialogue. much of the m-23's military success and prowess and would not have been possible without outside support. there's a credit to ballpark -- body of evidence that corroborates the assertions of the u.n. experts that the rwanda government provided significant military and political support to the end-23. while there is evidence of uganda providing support to and- 23, we do not have a body of evidence suggesting that the ugandan government as a policy supported the m-23. nonetheless, we sit and -- we continue to urge, ugandan officials that -- to make sure that supplies do not originate or travel through that territory. and we have not limited our response to diplomacy alone. as required by the fiscal year 2012 appropriations act, secretary clinton suspended foreign
otherwise been in a landfill. they were made by impoverished women in uganda, so, it is great to help them, as well. >> and what is this? >> these are cute little cosmeticsers make of ups, pen, anything. >> and what are the calendars? >> they are the jersey club best seller. they are wildly popular for 30 years. they are $15, they last all year. if you work in a cubicle it is a great way to bring nature into your workspace. >> are we green again? you are using paper but i could be using this on my calendar online? >> yes, but paper is paper. there is a cost to everything. >> paper, cardboards for wrap something. >> when i give gift, i like to sort of wrap a gift within a gift. find a out reasonable shopping bag. tie a little ribbon on top and put that under the tree, that way it is two gifts in one and you don't have the waste, so, you can do pretty limb jewelry box, pot for a plant. >> and what is this? >> there is from haiti. >> this is made out of what? >> a reup cycle second-degree oil drum. >> that is. >> an up-cycle oil drum. >> that is amazing! who would have thought. whe
the ultimate underdog. >> it's the story of a girl in one of the poorest spots on earth, a slum in uganda, one day scrounging for food, and it turns out she's amazing at chess. she ends up traveling the world becoming the subject of a viral news article, this book right here and a brief documentary on youtube and now on top of all that, disney is working on a movie about her. i got to speak with with 16-year-old phiona muesi. i started by asking phiona like. >> i decided for my brother to get a couple and when i that's when i started learning chess. >> because there was an area in which if you went and learned chiz, you could get a bowl of porridge, right? and that would help feed you and your brother. so you go into this place, you see people playing chess, had you ever seen it before? did you know what it was? >> no, i had never seen chess, so it was my first time to play chess. >> robert, let me ask you, what is it about phiona, is she a prodigy? you said you discovered something about your chess skills that you hadn't seen before. >> i think she had an extra natural talent, which is extrao
with the surrounding nations like rwanda and uganda and burundi and others that are critical. so we want to explore further. and obviously a huge diplomatic element to this as well. i think it's critically important that the u.s. engage, that the u.n. engage a high level envoy to that region either from the u.s. or nup could make a critical difference. i know secretary carson has been working on the issues and others have as well and we're interested to hear more about what we can do to help move forward those efforts and imsuccessful. this is something that does matter to us in addition to the security issues there's incredible economic opportunity in this region of africa. economic opportunity for trade, partnerships with u.s. businesses but we have to get the stability there in order to take advantage of those opportunities. so again i thank the chairman for having this hearing. i look forward to the testimony and learning what more we can do to help the situation in the eastern drc. thank you. i yield back. >> thank you. we will have two panels today. the first panel we have the honorable derek
on, is this anti-homosexually bill in uganda which would make homosexuality punishable by the death penalty. it's wound its way through the system, on the precipes of being passed. the speaker of the house of representatives says she's going to pass this bill as a gift to the people of uganda by christmas. so the next two and a half weeks are critical and we're not seeing enough of that and putting enough pressure on them, although i have to say, hillary clinton has been just tremendous on this. >> and that's true. karen, you worked with secretary of state clinton before. and she has been certainly trying to push the ball forward on this. when we talk about the balance between domestic priorities and international priorities, the sort of the party line is, look in a time of economic calamity, americans are focused on what's happening at home and not on the global stage. that complicates our efforts to intervene abroad. >> hillary has been outspoken and well spoken about why it matters to us at home, in part because of our moral leadership in the world. that's part of what was tragic
abuses ploding all over the world. in uganda there is a bill that is a homosexual bill that would make those acts punishable by death. >> right here we are working on the farm worker's bill. >> as a kennedy, what do you make of what is going on in washington? >> well, i think it is very, very hard with the tea party. they came to washington to destroy it. >> the american people have spoken and everybody missed teddy. he was great friends with people on both sides of the aisle. >> the rfk center, let's turn to more cheery things. >> if you are watching, get out there and get on that website and bid higher. there is a signed taylor swift guitar. and fly fishing. >> and it is a great cause. www.charitybuzz.com. and finally, let's come to this car accident that you had. because it was a strange case where you had taken an ambien sleeping pill in the morning. >> yes, i reached for my thyroid medication and took the wrong pills. i was on my way to the gym and got into the car and got into a car accident. but there was no alcohol in my blood. and that is what happened. >> coming up. >> thank
by palestinians and terrorists, and flown, plausibly to uganda. he was the only casualty on the israeli side. >> it was a miraculous -- >> turn of events. >> he's also the older brother of prime minister benjamin netanyahu, and there's another brother. so he was, and the father is very famous, too. he's quite a great hero in the eyes of the israeli people. but the point of it all is that yes, everyone has been touched i death and bylaws, and by horror. there's so many -- but people recognize that life is precious when they face these things. i think you really know how to celebrate it. they don't, the night of the first siren went off in jerusalem, i thought something had gone wrong with the siren and it didn't really get it right away. them i never came to the door and she said are you all right? i said yes. she said that was an air raid siren. she said you had to come to dinner. it was friday night, and so i didn't really want to go because i wanted to surf the net and see what happened last night i couldn't really use my phone because -- she said put in your pocket and put on vibrate, if
all over the world. and one that we're working very hard on right now is in uganda. there's anti-homosexuality bill that would make homosexual acts punishment by the death penalty. >> completely outrageous. >> it is. and the speaker of the house there said she's going to deliver this bill as a christmas present. so, we have 2 1/2 weeks to stop that bill right now. >> imagine. it's disgusting, isn't it? >> it certainly is. as people across this state, we're in new york state. you don't need a passport to work on human rights. right here, we're working on the farm workers bill. in the united states, farm workers don't have a right to overtime pay. they don't have a right to form a union. they can be fired. there's plenty of work to do here. >> as a kennedy, i've met quite a few kennedys. you're all great people from this great family. what do you make of what's going on in washington, with this ludicrous kind of paralyzing, of any sensible debate? it's something that the kennedys, the clan, were good negotiators. they get stuff done. they wouldn't tolerate years of endless nonsense
be outraged if it was anything except in asia. >> we never bombed uganda. >> there was an outcry. >> but tom, there was an outcry over rwanda. there was an outcry in the sudan. we have a record of tolerating african genocide. >> i don't know if it is a really good record. we do have a record. but i think you would all agree that north korea is a uniquely distopian bleak -- it is unbelievable how much of a -- >> are you right. >> it is like another planet. >> i understand what you are saying. it is like we are allowing this weird world to exist, and why is that? >> as it was brought up, a, they have nukes. and b, because they have china. >> despairs the western -- as far as the western mind is earn cked it is an asian thing. >> oh that's what they do out there. >> we defended south korea and lost a lot of lives doing that. we didn't just sit around going, oh it is asia. >> i know. >> and we have 40,000 troops stationed in south korea. >> we are talking a lot about this. >> we should move on. women senators say they would have reached a budget deal. greg, there will be 20 female senators and n
you open the papers anytime today in nigeria, uganda but the church has been burned down. worshipers have been killed by machine guns. buildings are bombed out of existence. even within this religion, there are different grades of purity. one side considers the other side not sufficiently deserving of terminal censorship. the institution is complicated. there is never one single issue that leads to total breakdown of society. politics entered into it. modernization, corruption, all of these are part of the growth in the widening of the area of fanaticism. when the politicians won't power, they have no scruples whatever. they utilize and they do utilize any differences, whether ethnic or religious. the growing principles of the sanction is religion. we have very strange political system. we are moving on to northern nigeria. sitting here in the library, we believe you all deserve terminal censorship. [laughter] >> schooling, anything at all having to do with -- anything outside of this. it is very easy to mobilize the youth who sit at the feet of the schools. they take orders from the
be creating a website from hungary or uganda or pakistan. it's really tricky. that's why the critical thing is for the public to understand that they need to do their due diligence. they need to do their research to make sure it's a legitimate charity before they actually give to it. >> attorney general jepsen, thank you for your time. >> thank you. >>> a woman who lives in iowa drove all the way to newtown, connecticut, after the tragedy. she came to show that how something as simple as pie can bring smiles to a grieving community. we share her story ahead. >>> last time we told you about a troubling situation in syria, for more than a year now, zaidoun has been our voice inside syria. he put his own safety at risk repeatedly at his request, i should add, to tell us about the brutality of the assad regime. the horrors of the war raging around him. the freedom to speak out. he did it over and over, bravely speaking with us more than a dozen times. speaking truth to the ongoing lies the assad regime has repeatedly told. this week we learned that zaidoun and his brother were taken away by syr
deployed in uganda, 76 are in kosovo, that is left over from the peace-keeping mission from the '90s. and in yemen, there are troops after the attack on the embassy, they were told in the president's letter that tonight the troops remain in libya and in yemen for the future. but even beyond that accounting from the president to congress tonight, we do have one more nation to add to that list of where americans are deployed abroad. they are deployed now to turkey. and this is the second thing to know in today's news that is swallowed by the vortex of the news today. they are being deployed to turkey in order to operate these. this is a patriot missile launcher, this is a u.s.-made surface to air missile system, designed to seek out and find incoming missiles. designed to shoot rockets out of the sky. as the syrian government is accused by nato of using scud missiles inside syria, the u.s. is now sending to battles of patriot missiles. that is the nation of turkey, turkey had requested these patriot missile batteries earlier this month. today we found out they are not only getting the
a songwriter and worked extensively with musical groups including an african children's chorus based in uganda and composed of the condon and kenyan orphans. i may add that she has passed on her artistic gifts to her two sons,. .. and dylan. .. is a gifted photographer and photographs on the cover of the book. dylan is dylan is a gifted songwriter and musician. as her work in africa may suggest she has also been an extensive traveler, works in africa, africa, south and east asia, europe and of course the middle east. by far the largest part of her work has been as an author, both acknowledged and if i may put it this way is a quiet partner. she has in either way more than 60 books to her credit and a number of genres, poetry, fiction, both adult and children's and a book of an adult romantic chirla g. if i remember craig -- correctly and tales of the king. a lot of her work has been nonfiction and that too has covered a variety of subjects. some of her nonfiction has dealt with the issue of single motherhood. but a good deal is still somehow or other with the issue of religion and the life o
to stop the anti-homosexuality bill in uganda which would make homosexuality punishable by the death penalty. liz: have you accomplished some of the things you've set out to today the? >> absolutely. we freed prisoners from south korea and kenya. we created change on basic human rights issues around the world and in the united states. liz: but it all requires money. >> exactly. liz: here is where the auction comes in. so the beneficiaries as we put it up on the screen are from some amazing internships and experiences. you see a lot of these in new york but let's get to the first one. it is right up our viewers alley. have you ever wanted to have lunch, a power lunch with the ultimate financial titans one of whom is with us today, robert wolf, a board member as well. you and bill ackman of pershing and i love this group of people. you've got, okay, aside from you two. >> we've got mark la serrie at avenue. tony james the president of blackstone. obviously you mentioned bill at pershing. that is one, that luncheon is one of the auction items. liz: where is the lunch will be. we made it
't suggest that everything is perfect in countries like uganda, and rwanda and ethiopia and south africa, but nonetheless, there's been progress in all these places, and we sometimes had to work with people who weren't perfect, but this author made it sound as if she was somehow guilty by association with anything they did wrong, and somehow had picked the wrong people to try to work with. i thought it was an absurd argument, and it sort of contributes to the same tone we've been hearing the last few weeks. >> well, there have been all these things coming out that people have been lobbing her way, and does this need to be resolved one way or the other? the president now we're told might even wait several more weeks before making decisions, not clear whether that's going to take place, but meanwhile, you have john kerry, who is going to be holding hearings on benghazi. hillary clinton is going to be testifying when that report comes out. we expect it by next week at the latest. that is the investigative panel, which will be turned over to the senate and house foreign affairs and foreign r
-- more often than not, they are out of state. they could be creating a website from hungary or uganda or pakistan. it's really tricky. that's why the critical thing is for the public to understand that they need to do their due diligence. they need to do their research to make sure it's a legitimate charity before they actually give to it. >> attorney general jepsen, thank you for your time. >> thank you. >>> a woman who lives in iowa drove all the way to newtown, connecticut, after the tragedy. she came to show that how something as simple as pie can bring smiles to a grieving community. we share her story ahead. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer
of mogadishu. it's clear to me that al-shabab is largely in a survival mode. they're under pressure from uganda forces from mogadishu. kenyans forces from the southwest, and ethopian forces, and increasingly, partners with somali forces. that's a pretty good model. you're never going -- i'm not polly anish about this. i don't think we're ever going to completely eliminate al-shabab. not going to completely eliminate al shack -- al-shabab, but this concerted effort, africa led, international community supported, has afforded the somali people something they haven't had for 20 years, and that's hope. that's not insignificant. the challenge now is less military, the security environment is improving. it's now -- how doout yao get local governance in? get economic development so people have opportunities? just over the past year, if we had sat in this conference room a year ago and said, hey in december of 2013, sew mallways going to have a president, a constitution, parliament, al-shabab won't be in control of widespread areas across the country, we would all say, you're crazy. that's not going to
international security assistance peace right and you have african nations, including uganda and rwanda and participate, that gives you some breathing space to move on. that is the essential thing that first. to happen first brok >> you have to deal with governments, but obviously creating greater security -- >> governments at which level? "you cannot frankly do real governance of the provisional level with governors unless you're dealing with the capital, because of the nature of the congolese government. you start where you are, and you have monusco, with no real effectiveness, try to bring in units or create a new unit within it that has that capacity. if i were forced to make a choice, and i was dealing at the provincial level, the only force out there right now is monus whyco. would try to bring units in the letter actually capable -- monusco. i would try to bring units that are actually capable. i think it is really getting in there and working without putting our forces at real risk that is going to be necessary. i have actually worked with the national government, and it is not
in uganda. she discovered chess and turns out to a progidy. she inspired a documentary and book. fiona and her chess coach actually spoke with josh leves. >> before i discovered chess i was living in a hard life where he was sleeping on the streets and you didn't have anything to eat in the streets. so that's when i decided for my brother to get a couple for it, and that's when i started learning chess. >> because there was an area in which if you went and learned chess, you could get a bowl of porridge to feed you and your brother. you saw people playing chess. hu ever seen it before? did you know what ffs? >> no, i hadn't. it was my first time to play chess. >> robert, let me ask you, what is about phiona? is she a prodigy. you discovered something in her about her chess skills you hadn't seen before. >> i come to believe she has an extra natural talent, which is extraordinary. we've been able to go to the high profile kind of tournaments or the olympiad, which we never thought of even being at. >> i sat there playing against girls and boys. then i started beating the boys. when i pl
of uganda back in the '70s and '80s, to everybody in kenya. and he traveled with us. we met him yesterday, had three or four hours of fascinating discussion, and then he traveled with us today in the morning. he was very close to barack obama, sr. and to obama's patron, onyango, and knows all of the political intrigue in kenya and a lot of the personal promise and flaws of barack obama, sr. >> was he valuable? did you have to listen carefully to what he said? >> well, it was not easy to -- luckily, this is the other thing. you can go on a trip like this unprepared. so i had spent months studying kenya politics, learning everything i could, going to an archive in syracuse that had the kenya archive. a lot of information i got from there. and i really knew a lot of the background. if you just had a conversation cold with leo, you wouldn't have understood a word he said. but i knew where he was going. i knew a lot of the beginnings of the stories, and so yes, i could piece it together, and filled in 100 holes for me. both of politics and of obama's seniors personalized. >> last question. you
the dictator of uganda back in the 70s and 80s to everybody in kenya. he traveled with us. we met him yesterday had three or four hours of fascinating discussions and then traveled with us today in the morning. he was very close to barack obama senior into obama speech or in an assault the political intrigue of kenya and a lot of the personal promise and flaws of barack obama senior. >> host: was a valuable? did you have to listen carefully to what he said? >> guest: he was not ead? >> guest: he was not easy -- broccoli, this is the other key thing. you can't go on a trip like this unprepared. i spent months studying kenyan politics, going to an archive at the university of syracuse at the kenya national archives, a lot of information i got from there. and i really knew a lot of the background. if you just had a conversation cold with leo you wouldn't understand a word he said here but i knew where he was going. i knew a lot of the beginnings of the stories and so yes i could piece it together and it filled in 100 holes
ranging from uganda to taiwan. that's very very popular. kids are always -- >> kids and animals. >> it's always a great time this time of year to be supporting that. >> you can find things right in your own back yard. >> absolutely. lots of projects in maryland and the dc area as well. >> this is a nice idea. especially for the person who has everything. >> especially this time of year. there's so much going on in the world. people are really wanting to do something positive, have a positive impact. >> not just christmas time. but birthdays. >> absolutely. >> just donate to this particular charity. that's a good place to go. thank you very much. global giving. >> global giving dot org. >> have a happy holiday. >> thank you. >> for more information you can go to globalgiving.org. stay with us, the spca joins us next. >> welcome back. joining us from the spca is a pet looking for a good home. who do we have here? >> this is little chloe. this is a 5-year-old poodle mix. she came to us from another shelter. and she had an actual wound from a grooming mishap. she had to have a few staples.
weapon ban, so-called. every gun is an assault weapon. the machetes in uganda, or i'm sorry, rwanda, the worst genocide that we know of in human history. 800,000 or so, with a ma -- with machetes. of course we know during world war ii, the genocide wasn't just 800,000, it was millions. six million jews, killed by all kinds of means. so we need to be smart about the way we deal with this issue of mass murders and violence in our society. everything should be on the table. and as we continue to remember the loved ones of those who were victims of the tragedy at newtown, connecticut, things go on here in this town. this body, we've been alerted tomorrow, will vote on what's being called plan b. plan a was to try to reach an agreement with the president. but from my experience as an attorney, i've negotiated small deals, multimillion dollar deals, i have certified -- i was district judge, chief justice, certified mediator, i don't know if there's anybody else in the congressional body that's been through the training and process of becoming an international arbitrator. and a lot of expe
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)